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Friday, October 30, 2015

NC Arboretum


Our time in Asheville is coming to a close, but the rains have stopped and we have the afternoon to explore the Arboretum.

Although I have never attempted to cultivate a bonsai, they have always intrigued me.    I'm not sure I have the patience to bring one to the point of calling it a bonsai, but I can certainly admire the work of others.        These are almost all small enough to sit on a coffee table yet it is obvious most have been around for many years.





This tree has two full size quince.    Unbelievable.







This one was a little larger - you would want a table for it.







The Arboretum also has a permanent outdoor art collection.

These gates represent the Bent Creek that meanders throughout their acreages.






"Hedge Against Extinction" represents stylized human hands forming a hedge.    It honors those who stand together to nurture and share the treasurers of this planet's plant life.



This screen shows a farmer plowing a field.





This is a living quilt garden to honor all the quilters, past and present.    Unfortunately, they had already been cleared for the season.



I know there are gardeners back in the Midwest who have grown Rush, but I have never seen them bloom.     They are gorgeous.









After walking the 65 acres of cultivated gardens, we decided to take a hike.     They have 10 miles of hiking trails and I assigned RJ the task of picking one while I did a little more exploring.      To make a long hike story short, I finally stopped and asked him how long was this trail.    His answer (with an odd smile) was that it was several segments put together and he'd never added up the total.      Where is my FitBit when I need it?  




1 comment:

  1. Oh that looks like an incredible place to visit! I love the way they've grouped several trees together for a little bonsai forest, I've not seen them done that way before. There's just too many lovely gardens to explore and enjoy...and all them don't involve any labor on our part. It's good to be a nomad.

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